Author Topic: Kokanee in RCL?  (Read 11770 times)

funnysloper

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Re: Kokanee in RCL?
« Reply #25 on: June 18, 2012, 09:16:16 PM »
Well I believe jim would be the defintive expert on the fish in
RCL but if they arent Kokanee what are they. I will definitely keep
the next one I catch and take it in to him for his opinion.

saudust

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Re: Kokanee in RCL?
« Reply #26 on: June 19, 2012, 09:30:43 AM »
Creek Dude, maybe ask Jim if any Kamloop were planted.  The web indicates Crowley and "other" high country lakes have received them over the years.  Not sure if Kamloop change into spawning colors, but they match the description funnysloper gave of silver bodies and light olive backs along with the forked tail, which the juveniles have, though the dramatic fork disappears as they mature.
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Troutmom

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Re: Kokanee in RCL?
« Reply #27 on: June 21, 2012, 09:47:53 AM »
I can't count the number of fish I have caught in the last 50 plus years in the Sierras that had pink meat... All the fish I caught in Crowley on opening weekend were pink meated fish....I have caught countless fish in the Upper and Lower Owens River over the years that were pink meated fish..  I always assume that if the meat is pink or orange colored its a natural or wild fish,, not ones that has been raised on hatchery pellets...
My dad always told me the fish with the pink/orange meat were natural fish while the ones with white meat were stockers - he also said you can tell by the fins and tails - though I don't remember what he said about that.  The fish I caught at Crowley during opener had beautiful pink meat.
Kim

Mcgee Dude

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Re: Kokanee in RCL?
« Reply #28 on: June 21, 2012, 12:59:24 PM »
The fins on the "natural" fish are beautiful. Full fins no marks, usually have white tips on them or "ivory" tips. Fins on natural fish are amazing, and there is no doubting once you see them that they are natural.
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Creek Dude

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Re: Kokanee in RCL?
« Reply #29 on: June 21, 2012, 01:09:30 PM »
Alpers trout have pink meat from the food that Tim Alpers feeds them...And I know that Convict, Crowley, RCL, and all the other local lakes have Alpers stocked.  So if you're going on the pink meat theory and the fish is 2+ pounds, I'd just about guarantee that it's an Alpers trout.
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Topwater Terry

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Re: Kokanee in RCL?
« Reply #30 on: June 21, 2012, 03:03:54 PM »
The fish at the top of this pic had pink meat,  but as far as I can tell the body of the fish did not look much different than other fish in the pic.  It was caught in mid May,  and I really doubt that it was a holdover,  not sure if stockers could survive the winter in Rock Creek.  The Alpers I have caught have had a bright red stripe,  almost like a wild trout would have,  maybe since they are raised in a more natural environment and not in concrete channels.  No round nose or clipped fins either.  Maybe the big fish in the pic was raised in a different hatchery or something or was given different food.  Ya'll think this fish was an alpers?
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OldSarge

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Re: Kokanee in RCL?
« Reply #31 on: June 21, 2012, 04:07:16 PM »
After a little research, this is what I have come up with concerning the coloration of salmon and trout meat.

The pink/orange color comes from carotenoids. Beta-carotene makes carrots orange.
Carotenoids are produced by plants and their microscopic relatives called microalgae. The microalgae are eaten by small crustaceans and fish. Larger fish eat these. The carotenoids build up and cause the tint in the meat.

It stands to reason that native fish, and hold-overs that have been in a naturally rich food environment for a while will have pink to orange flesh. Also makes sense as to why they taste better.

Alpers are fed a diet close to their natural feed; hence the good color and flavor.

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TEX

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Re: Kokanee in RCL?
« Reply #32 on: June 22, 2012, 02:13:30 AM »
The only Kokanee I've seen in RCL in 30yrs comes in a bottle  :drunk: *burp*
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funnysloper

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Re: Kokanee in RCL?
« Reply #33 on: June 25, 2012, 08:55:53 PM »
Everybody do me a favor and if you catch one of these critters take
it in to jim at the store so he wont think I am crazy lol. :fishing3: mz
« Last Edit: June 25, 2012, 09:02:14 PM by Creek Dude »

Topwater Terry

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Re: Kokanee in RCL?
« Reply #34 on: June 25, 2012, 11:24:47 PM »
Anything is possible,  I was catching a certain strain of trout in the creek for years,  and creekdude thought I was crazy...till he caught one :lol: :rotflmao: :fishing3:
Once I arrive at Tom's Place...well,  you know...nothing else matters...