Author Topic: Pics from Scout  (Read 46231 times)

saudust

  • Eastern Sierra Legend
  • *****
  • Posts: 1539
    • View Profile
Re: Pics from Scout
« Reply #100 on: March 26, 2013, 10:19:53 AM »
Thanks, Creek Dude.  That's a great link.  The brochure on "The High Sierra" has a date of 1937 listed in it and speaks of the dam that will be built at Grant Lake among other topics.  Really cool that you and Scout and others are lending such interesting background to our favorite place to be. 

I need to see 395 and be heading north.
Let me wake laughing from a nap in the afternoon under the aspens in the fall.

Creek Dude

  • Humboldt Creeker
  • Administrator
  • Eastern Sierra Legend
  • *****
  • Posts: 1373
    • View Profile
Re: Pics from Scout
« Reply #101 on: March 30, 2013, 03:29:55 PM »


In the mid 1930's, Tom suffered the first in a series of strokes. He spent a year in a hospital in Soutthern California, then he was able to come back to the area, but no where near the capacity as before. He was in and out of "rest homes" of the era, primarily in Bishop. I don't know much about this time in his life, as nobody ever really talked about it. It must have been tough for him to be in the area he loved, but unable to partake in the activities he had previously.

The one story that I remember took place shortly before he passed away in 1940. My Grandmother told me that she went down to Bishop to see him one evening. While she was sitting with him, he said something to this effect....

"We both know that I am going to die, and after I do, I think that you should remarry. We have this man Kime working for us....his name rhymes with "kind", and that's the type of man he is. After I die, I think you should marry him"....

My Grandmother was only fifty, Tom was fifty four. After he passed away, she did indeed marry Kime Eldridge, the gentleman in the attached photo. They eloped to Reno about six months after Tom died. She had been married to Tom since 1914, 26 years, and she and Kime were married until she passed away in 1975, another 35 years. By looking at this picture of Kime after a duck hunt, it seems that she was attracted to men who hunted or fished while wearing ties (see a previous story about Tom fishing in a suit).

Kime was the Grandfather that I grew up with, a fine fisherman in his own right. He was important in my beginnings in fishing, He owned a cabin on Rock Creek, right below Tom's Place. It's still there. I spent all of my summer vacations in that cabin, until the late 60's, when Kime sold it. The Forest Service was in the process of removing the cabins on the creek, to build Tuff Camp, and Kime was afraid that they were going to take his, and he didn't want to be there when they did....if only he'd known that it would survive.

I'm fairly sure that this photo was taken locally....I like the socks on the radiator cap....as well as his tie. - SCOUT
"Rock the Creek." - Hardrock

beldingi

  • Rock Creek Guide
  • *****
  • Posts: 758
    • View Profile
    • Mateo Lab
Re: Pics from Scout
« Reply #102 on: March 30, 2013, 06:41:26 PM »
Another good one Scout! I like the gaiters!

Creek Dude

  • Humboldt Creeker
  • Administrator
  • Eastern Sierra Legend
  • *****
  • Posts: 1373
    • View Profile
Re: Pics from Scout
« Reply #103 on: April 06, 2013, 08:08:33 AM »


This was undoubtedly taken on the same trip as the last picture of Kime...same car, same hat....it's still hard to tell where he might have been, but probably somewhere local. Quite the set up, huh?

I have assorted journals that my Grandmother wrote through the years, where she states things like "Tom and friends off to fish Chalk Bluffs for a few days." In those days they didn't just go out and hunt or fish for an afternoon, they made an excursion out of it, even if they were fairly close to home. it wasn't as easy as today to just throw your stuff in the car and go out for a few hours, it was a trip, sometimes a lengthy trip.

Try to imagine going even 25 miles from home without the benefit of four lane paved highways, gas stations everywhere, and restaurants every few miles.....the Upper Owens River must have been a true adventure. - Scout
« Last Edit: April 06, 2013, 08:11:50 AM by Creek Dude »
"Rock the Creek." - Hardrock

Gary C.

  • Rock Creek Guide
  • *****
  • Posts: 968
    • View Profile
Re: Pics from Scout
« Reply #104 on: April 06, 2013, 12:21:57 PM »
Talking about what an ordeal it used to be to go places reminded me of this backround to a geocache along the 14 near the 178 turn off. I can't imagine doing that much driving in a Model T back in the day. After reading this I did an internet search and there is lot of info out there about him, very interesting man. As you near Hwy 178 headed north you can see a big steel cross on the right. That is his memoriel and where the geocache is located.

FR. Crowley was known as the "Desert Padre". He was a naturalist, conservationist, movie producer, storyteller and first priest to celebrate mass on the summit of Mt. Whitney. He struggled to enhance the economic base of the Eastern Sierra in the 1930's, by promoting it as a tourist mecca while ministering to his parishoners. His initial parish covered 30,000 square miles. His northernmost church was in Bishop, 200 miles from its southern counterpart in Barstow, thereby giving his parish the distinction of being in the highest part of the United States (Mt. Whitney) and the lowest (Death Valley). In his first 16 months here he put over 50,000 miles on his model T which he kept ready for any emergency. Sadly, he was killed at the age of 48 when his car struck a steer and he collided with an oncoming truck.
He ranks at the top of the truly monumental characters of the Eastern Sierras and Owens Valley region.
Cache is a very short walk from the road...stop and stretch your legs. Cache has lots of goodies including a TB that like to be in the desert.


Creek Dude

  • Humboldt Creeker
  • Administrator
  • Eastern Sierra Legend
  • *****
  • Posts: 1373
    • View Profile
Re: Pics from Scout
« Reply #105 on: April 20, 2013, 09:47:21 PM »


I don't have a lot of pictures of Tom's Place in the winter, probably due to the fact that my Grandmother, who took a lot of the pictures that I have, (other than the Frasher Photos), was always down in Southern California during the winter, while my Mom went to school, and I doubt that Tom was really into photography. Up until the mid 30's, Tom's Place was more or less shut down during the winter months. Until Tom had the first of his strokes, he stayed there in the winter, but didn't operate it as a resort....I imagine that he was available if a problem arose to lend assistance.

A lot of things happened in the mid 30's. With the advent of skiing in the area, both Tom and Hazel recognized the possibilities involved with catering to the skiers, with lodging as well as feeding them in the Cafe. After Tom started slowing down, they would lease Tom's Place to groups during the winter, letting those people deal with the day to day operation. Somewhere I have a list of Hollywood folks who would come up to ski McGee Mt.,, and stay at Tom's, including Henry Fonda, Tyrone Powers, and others.

There is a very good book about Dave McCoy, called "Tracks of Passion", written by Robin Morning, that will go into much more detail about this so I won't try. It's big and expensive, but well worth it. Along with telling Dave's story, she does an excellent job of describing the area from the beginning days of tourism...it's worth looking into.

This looks like a spring storm to me, with heavy, wet snow clinging to the trees, and the road looks shiny and wet, not icy. We're looking toward Hilton and McGee. - Scout
"Rock the Creek." - Hardrock

saudust

  • Eastern Sierra Legend
  • *****
  • Posts: 1539
    • View Profile
Re: Pics from Scout
« Reply #106 on: April 21, 2013, 06:39:43 AM »
Beautiful.  Thanks, guys.  Now to find "Tracks of Passion".  That ought to make good reading.
Let me wake laughing from a nap in the afternoon under the aspens in the fall.

Fredb

  • Guest
Re: Pics from Scout
« Reply #107 on: April 21, 2013, 08:20:47 AM »
Amazon has it for $ 155-$160 or $75 at their website http://www.tracksofpassion.com
« Last Edit: April 21, 2013, 08:30:03 AM by Fredb »

Creek Dude

  • Humboldt Creeker
  • Administrator
  • Eastern Sierra Legend
  • *****
  • Posts: 1373
    • View Profile
Re: Pics from Scout
« Reply #108 on: May 11, 2013, 09:57:17 PM »


This was taken in about 1918 or so, judging by the size of my Mom. That's Tom with her, but I have no idea who the lady is...they've all got clothes on, so I guess it's all right....and I think my G'ma took the picture. I also don't know exactly where they are, but by the dim hillside in the background, it looks like the spot where the Whitmore pool is now. It was interesting to find out that people used the hot water in those days. This brings up another part of my childhood up here (part time), which involves a true character of the area in the early days.

Sometime in the mid 20's, a guy named Andy Anderson arrived on the scene. He built one of the first cabins on the creek below Tom's Place (still there), and lived there until the mid 1970's. An excellent hunter and fisherman, he was well known by everybody. He was a jack of all trades, but most people talk about his carpentry. He built a lot of the cabins in the area, helped work on Tom's Place over the years, and helped Dave McCoy build the original buildings and chair lifts on Mammoth Mountain.

Back to the hot tubs....in the mid 30's, Andy decided that it would be nice to sit in hot water after hunting ducks on the Owens River, so he built a small tub out of marble and cement, piped water from the hot water source, and he had what has to be one of the first real hot tubs in the area. Then he decided that it would be nicer if he didn't get snow in his hair while soaking, so he built a small "house" over the tub, and he was really set. Throughout the years, people would burn down the little house ( on purpose?, by accident?, I don't know), and Andy would go out and rebuild it. The tub is still there, one of my favorites....some people call it the "Shepherd's Tub", but I call it Andy's tub...

I have yet to find a picture of Andy, for some reason nobody that I know ever took one. He was Danish, most called him the "crazy Swede", short, with piercing blue eyes, drove a WWII surplus Willy's Jeep, always wore khakis, had packs of feral dogs that would follow him around. I always heard that he was involved in the fight against the aqueduct...very involved....I heard stories about him going out and blowing up a part of the system, then high tailing it for the back country to hide out for a while. Then, when things calmed down, he'd go out and do it again, repeating the process. I believe it...even when I knew him, he despised the City of L.A., and what they'd done.

Whenever we arrived at our cabin, the first thing we'd do is go over to Andy's ( his cabin is right across the creek from my Grandfather's)...he could scare the bejabbers out of us, but he was one of the nicest guys I've ever known. When I was about ten, my Dad taught me the basics of fly fishing, we all went out to the River, and, using a borrowed rod, I caught a fair sized brown ( dumb luck)...when we got back to the cabin, my parents told me that I should go over to show Andy my fish...he admired it, then told me to follow him into his garage...he reached into a corner and pulled out a bamboo fly rod, handed it to me and said " I think you may need this"...then reached up on a shelf, found a Martin fly reel, and handed that to me....another shelf had a box of flies, some leaders....I was set. When I got back to our cabin, I found out he'd done that for every kid in our family....I wish I still had all that stuff.

In the 70's Andy had the first in a series of strokes (sounds like Tom), and was in rest homes in Bishop and Big Pine. I'd stop in to see him whenever I came up....the same piercing blue eyes, a grip like iron, he'd always say "Hi young man"...the last time I saw him, he had all his khaki clothes lined out on the end of his bed. I asked him what they were for, he told me " as soon as this d@#!%ed nurse gets out of here, I'm going fishing"....I wonder if he made it....
"Rock the Creek." - Hardrock

Creek Dude

  • Humboldt Creeker
  • Administrator
  • Eastern Sierra Legend
  • *****
  • Posts: 1373
    • View Profile
Re: Pics from Scout
« Reply #109 on: May 13, 2013, 03:59:28 PM »
It's my fault...I was putting stuff on Facebook and waiting to see if the site/board would resolve.  My computer at work is pulling up the site and board fine...not at home though...

Anyway, my fault, not Scout's.
"Rock the Creek." - Hardrock

RockNCreekGirl

  • Eastern Sierra Legend
  • *****
  • Posts: 1365
  • Creek Girl for Life!
    • View Profile
Re: Pics from Scout
« Reply #110 on: May 13, 2013, 04:03:21 PM »
Great storries from the past Scout.  That is probably why I love the area so much.  There is so much history of a time when life was hard, yet simple. 
The creek is waiting...

saudust

  • Eastern Sierra Legend
  • *****
  • Posts: 1539
    • View Profile
Re: Pics from Scout
« Reply #111 on: May 15, 2013, 09:34:06 AM »
These stories and history are so valuable and very much appreciated here, gentlemen.  Thanks so much.
Let me wake laughing from a nap in the afternoon under the aspens in the fall.

Creek Dude

  • Humboldt Creeker
  • Administrator
  • Eastern Sierra Legend
  • *****
  • Posts: 1373
    • View Profile
Re: Pics from Scout
« Reply #112 on: July 22, 2013, 01:05:32 PM »
   

This is "Trouble", one of Prince's pups (look back in this post to see my Mom and all of the pups), standing with Rollo Meeks...no idea who Rollo was, but either he was fairly short, or Trouble was a tall dog. According to my Mom, Trouble got his name while he was young (naturally), it seems he'd do things like walk between two rocks that weren't quite wide enough for him to fit through, and get stuck. Instead of backing up, he'd sit there and howl until somebody came to get him out...always getting into trouble....
   
My Uncle Bob moved to Tom's Place when he was a teenager, roughly 1935 (more on Uncle Bob to follow)....he is still alive and kicking, living in Oregon, and is able to tell me more stories about Tom's Place, and Trouble, who became his dog while he was there.. Here's one of the best.
   
They also called Trouble the "three shot dog". Occasionally Tom would take people hunting with him, often they took Trouble. They would be hunting whatever was in season...if Trouble heard three shots, and hadn't had to retrieve anything after those three shots, he would go back to the car, lay down underneath it and go to sleep, almost as if he were saying "you guys shot three times, there was nothing for me to go get, you don't really need me, since none of you can shoot very well"....
   
Trouble use to cruise all over the area, Bob says they would occasionally get a call from Lee Vining to tell them that Trouble was there...if you look on a map, it's really not that far as the crow flies (or as the dog runs), but it's still a ways from home. He would also be spotted between Tom's Place and Bishop...Uncle Bob said he once saw Trouble running alongside what looked like a female coyote, Trouble had a rabbit in his mouth...out for a picnic....
"Rock the Creek." - Hardrock

IW

  • New Creeker
  • *
  • Posts: 18
    • View Profile
Re: Pics from Scout - Early Sherwin Grade and Sand Canyon Road
« Reply #113 on: July 31, 2013, 08:54:54 PM »
I'm Lee Webb's older brother, Ian.

My father told me about he and his mother walking behind their car circa 1915 to 1920 driving up the Sherwin Grade.   Their job was to throw a log behind the car when it couldn't keep going to keep it from sliding back.   My dad would have been 5 to 10 years old at the time.   He said they'd start early morning and it'd be an all day job to get to the top of the grade.

The Sand Canyon Road, the main road in and out of Rock Creek at the time came down along the ridge overlooking Rock Creek Lake and you can see the rock field that it had to traverse if you start on the sandy area over on the Bishop side and walk along the road towards Rock Creek Lake.   (Good picture taking of the lake there.)  You can get there from the trail that is now the main  trail up to the lakes up in that area.  Instead of going left from that trail when you hit the old road, go right.  The "main road" by passed Rock Creek lake and as noted elsewhere crossed the Rock Creek "river" in the grassy meadow not far from the head of the falls that come into the lake.

I remember walking up the road in the late 1940s and early 1950s to catch fish in the deep in some areas of the meadow "mucky area" and crossing the creek on the bridge there.   A couple of logs and planks across it.  Jeeps were using it during that period of time.  The bridge over the years lost the planks during the winter and eventually was just a single old tree across the river and then even that disappeared.  And as said the road went on up and came to what is the road now just up from the bridge in the sandy area where the overflow parking from Mosquito Flats is.  I don't remember if that's still a camping area.   I think not.

That was THE MAIN ROAD used by the Pine Creek Mine for their ore all year round.

The BRANCH going to the lake took off just up the road from the cabins on the road from the campground where the gate now is.   If you walk up the road by the cabins and watch at the left you will see the main road that goes over the hill to Sand Canyon.  That road was blasted shut when the area was declared a Wilderness Area and they had to do it twice as the hunters had been building rocky ramps around the area so they could get through.  Also did that along the lower sandy area approaching "crankcase" to get access to upper Rock Creek.   So the Forest Service blasted more to shut the road the next year.

I remember when we drove up Crankcase that you could see the remnants of asphalt in some areas.   The "legend?" was that a movie company had paved crankcase so they could get their trucks up to Heart Lake where a movie was filmed.   Supposedly there was a wooden structure built from which a horse or horses jumped into Heart as part of the movie.   I've never been able to find out if that story is true or not.  Anybody know.  The "big cabin" overlooking the lake was supposedly built for use during the movie.  Electric turbine in the creek at the bottom of the falls, flush toilets and electric lights.   Access to it from a bridge near the creek side of the sandy area of the old road across the upper area of the beach.   That bridge would allow you to drive to below that cabin.   I remember it from before we had our cabin and would camp for a couple of weeks on the sandy area below the large cabin before the beach runs on where the rocks are.   

On the lower hill behind the gate nearest the creek from the campground the cabins were built with logs that were supposedly milled in Rock Creek.   There were 2? cabins right at the bottom of the falls on the far side of the creek and a bridge like that in the meadow above the falls.   They became over the years to be bridges to walk across as they weren't maintained.   The cabins were leveled and all carted away perhaps 30 or more years ago.   I remember finding pieces of cups and the like in the area.  The (now demolished and blown into trees) "Big Cabin" was also build from those logs as was the now demolished cabin overlooking Heart Lake.   When we were kids we'd often use the fairly rough small planks that may have been made for shingles to make things.  They were spread around the cabin areas. 

I'm wondering if the picture of the clothed bathers was at Hot Creek.   The reeds look like the area of Hot Creek that is now much different after "North to Alaska" was filmed there and the Forest Service closed the road and trail from the road on the bluff overlooking the Creek.   Of course, when we went in there during the summer few paid attention to bathing suits and it was a great stop after a week in Rock Creek without a shower and only a sponge bath before going to Bishop and doing some laundry and getting some more food at Safeway at the south end of the town.   And we kids would go to the fountain in the 5 & 10 and get a cone or a milk shake or malt for 35 or 50 cents if I remember correctly circa 1950.

Mammoth wasn't a destination and had no major market and only one or 2 restaurants where the main one was the "Split Pea Soup" place that we associate with the Santa Ynez Valley traveling south on highway 101 from San Luis Obispo to Santa Barbara  these days.   I never did like their soup and we rarely went to Mammoth in those days before there was even the ski lift propelled by the model A I think it was on blocks.

Enough "war stories!"

I had a Comcast/Xfinity modem failure that seems to have cured itself after I turned it off for a few hours.   So I decided I better read the stories and look at the GREAT PICTURES from Scout before it again stops working.   Going to try to get them to replace it tomorrow.




IW

  • New Creeker
  • *
  • Posts: 18
    • View Profile
Sawmill in Bishop and Hilton Creek
« Reply #114 on: August 01, 2013, 07:18:06 AM »
Another couple items I thought of and figured I'd add...

The SAWMILL...

I wonder how many remember that after one got down on the flatlands at the bottom of the Sherwin Grade there was a sawmill at the right on the outskirts of Bishop.

I remember the black smoke that it belched and recall going there in the 1940s when our cabin was under construction by us doing most of the work.

I think the sawmill was pretty well torn down many years ago and I don't recall even thinking about it the last several years.  I suspect going on the road parallel to 395 one could find the remnants of it.


HILTON CREEK

The other thing that caught my attention in taking time to look at all the great pictures and reading the stories is HILTON CREEK.

I can recall many years ago ...  perhaps the mid or late 1950s ... going with my father and perhaps one or both brothers to Hilton and camping on the rise before you drop into Hilton on the trail from Rock Creek.  Close enough to the creek to carry water in a 5 gallon can and far enough away from the mosquitoes to be able to function.

Come to think about it I wonder if my middle brother, Lee, remembers if we still have a cache of cooking items somewhere in that area as we do in Pioneer Basin???

I remember that my father wanted to climb one of the higher areas to look over the Hilton Creek canyon.   He was interested in answering some of his questions about the geology of that canyon.   Our father and I and likely at least one brother Lee scaled one of the higher areas in the area overlooking the Hilton Canyon.  We sat there for an hour or 2 as my father thought about the geology that he was wanting to verify.  From there we could see (and hear when the wind was calm) a truck driving up the canyon on the far side not far below the Hilton lake.   Our suspicion was that the lodge at Hilton was charging people as though everything had to be brought up the canyon with horses and was in reality trucking supplies up the canyon.

I never found out if that was true.   Seems that a stop would have been put to that in later years from the information from Scout.

vhbcinc

  • Weekender
  • ***
  • Posts: 245
    • View Profile
Re: Pics from Scout
« Reply #115 on: December 18, 2013, 07:50:47 AM »
Scout,

Thanks for the history and photographs.

Packer

  • Rock Creek Guide
  • *****
  • Posts: 932
    • View Profile
Re: Pics from Scout
« Reply #116 on: December 21, 2013, 08:07:54 AM »
The road up the front to Hilton Creek Lodge went very close to the last stretch before Davis Lake. From there they would pack in the supplies. If you pay attention, you can get quite far up following the path of the road, but it is an exposed constant up to get to the lakes that way. It is not even fun coming back down that way.
Pack it in, Pack it out...or have a Wrangler do it for you.