Author Topic: trekking poles  (Read 6654 times)

Sierraslam

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trekking poles
« on: December 17, 2012, 09:41:16 PM »
Anybody use Trekking poles? Are they worth the money? Can't old ski poles do the same thing? Thinking about investing, what are your thoughts?

Gary C.

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Re: trekking poles
« Reply #1 on: December 17, 2012, 10:55:32 PM »
I use them anytime I'm backpacking, if I don't my hands and fingers swell up. I was kind of worried about it until I asked around on a couple of backpacking sites and found out it's not that uncommon. Anyhow, if you are going to buy trekking poles now is a great time. There have been some great deals all fall on most discount sites. It seems that for most folks they either love useing poles or they don't. Most of the people I hike with use them. I find them very helpful pulling myself up steap trails, especially going up steps. Going down hill they help me keep balance by always having 2-3 points of contact with the trail.

If you get the Sierra Trading Post Deal Flyers there is a 40% off sale going on right now. They have some awesome prices on trekking poles at 40% off.

fishpole

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Re: trekking poles
« Reply #2 on: December 18, 2012, 09:11:39 AM »
Don't understand why hands and fingers would swell up if trek poles are not used. I have never needed them ,but I think ski poles "might" work if something is need for stability.

wshawkins

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Re: trekking poles
« Reply #3 on: December 18, 2012, 10:53:01 AM »
I use trekking poles on long hikes and backpacking trips, as they cushion the shock on my knees.  I can actually hike farther with trekking poles than without.  Trekking poles are especially helpful on stream crossings, up or down steep trails and passes and for passing over snow covered passes (I carry snow baskets that attach to the poles).   

I donít normally carry trekking poles on short day hikes and sometimes when theyíre not needed I just tie them to the back of my pack.
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Sierraslam

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Re: trekking poles
« Reply #4 on: December 18, 2012, 11:34:45 AM »
Gary, my hands and fingers swell as well. Usually only when I have a full pack on though. I think it's just because my arms just hang straight down for so long, along with the altitude and pack weight. I can see who the poles would force you to keep your arms bent, so maybe that's better for circulation. Going to invest in a pair.

OldSarge

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Re: trekking poles
« Reply #5 on: December 18, 2012, 11:51:44 AM »
I began using them a few years ago. The increased stability is helpful with my worn out knees.

I have noticed that using poles decreases the amount swelling of my hands that usually occurs with a heavy pack. I believe the swelling is from decreased blood flow due to constriction of flow at the shoulders. Maybe the angle of the arms, or using them along with your legs alleviates the condition.

I have seen them with camera mounts at the top of the handle also (mono-pod). Might come in handy for panoramic shots with a smaller camera.

One note. Don't go cheap. I bought an inexpensive pair at Walmart. Same poles were offered at Big 5 for almost twice the money. I have noticed that they are not as stout as some of the ones I've seen on the trail. Half the price, but probably less than 2/3 the quality and strength. Compare before you buy

I now think that I would pay more for better poles. You will probably keep them for many years, and they might help save your legs and make for more frequent and more enjoyable treks as you age.

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saudust

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Re: trekking poles
« Reply #6 on: December 18, 2012, 04:29:43 PM »
Sierraslam, you have an option for them as well and that being spring loaded tips or not.  My wife's pair are spring loaded and mine are rigid.  The springs help in cushioning, though I could care less just because I absolutely love mine and won't go on any hike without them due to my left knee being a "non-knee".  Let me put it this way; the hike down and out of Walker Lake is at a minimum 30% easier with them.  The stability you get on rough, uneven trail-terrain is immensely improved and the pull/push they can give you with your arm strength makes quite the difference.  I agree with OldSarge, don't go cheap.   Only word of caution when using them is catching the points in between rocks and roots, plus sometimes the tips sliding on rock surfaces when they are slightly hidden.
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playingmenace

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Re: trekking poles
« Reply #7 on: December 18, 2012, 06:34:12 PM »
Never had the swelling thing. But I did learn that when just using my wading staff to hike with, my knees stayed in much better shape. Trekking poles would be even better. They definetly cushion the impact on your legs.

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teejay

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Re: trekking poles
« Reply #8 on: December 18, 2012, 09:00:02 PM »
Itís quirky but I found using two poles awkward for hiking. I only use one.

Sierraslam

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Re: trekking poles
« Reply #9 on: December 19, 2012, 10:30:48 AM »
I'm sold. I hike with my fishing rod in one hand when on a day hike. I think one trekking pole would work on most of my hikes. I'm going to use two when backpacking. The down hills are really getting to my knees.

Little Hardrock

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Re: trekking poles
« Reply #10 on: December 19, 2012, 11:21:19 AM »
they have got to be good... have you ever noticed how when you pass by an 'ancient being' out there on the trail,, they ALL have trekking poles?!

« Last Edit: December 19, 2012, 02:50:03 PM by Little Hardrock »
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Gary C.

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Re: trekking poles
« Reply #11 on: December 19, 2012, 02:47:07 PM »
they have got to be good... have you ever noticed how when you pass by an 'ancient being' out there on the trail,, they ALL have terkking poles?
I think that I get passed by more of those ancient ones than I pass by.  :-\

Little Hardrock

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Re: trekking poles
« Reply #12 on: December 19, 2012, 02:50:56 PM »
they are who i want to be when i grow up:)
Hardrock, may his spirit live on in all of us.....

RockNCreekGirl

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Re: trekking poles
« Reply #13 on: December 19, 2012, 09:00:05 PM »
Have been hiking with trekking poles for awhile now and they do make a difference.  :hiking2: I have the shock absorbing type that has a spring.  They work great and pack up nicely and have been with me on trips to Arizona and Hawaii.  Just get a good pair like others have recommended.
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fishpole

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Re: trekking poles
« Reply #14 on: December 20, 2012, 04:22:31 PM »
Don't sit down along trail, have shrek poles with springs, and buy quality. (not Walmart crap)   Happy trails to you and to all a good night.  :clap: :clap: :clap:

Packer

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Re: trekking poles
« Reply #15 on: January 05, 2013, 04:23:25 PM »
As the saying goes... dont leave home without them.
« Last Edit: January 10, 2013, 10:58:36 PM by Packer »
Pack it in, Pack it out...or have a Wrangler do it for you.

GrantFarmington

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Re: trekking poles
« Reply #16 on: March 14, 2013, 02:39:17 PM »
Gary, my hands and fingers swell as well. Usually only when I have a full pack on though. I think it's just because my arms just hang straight down for so long, along with the altitude and pack weight. I can see who the poles would force you to keep your arms bent, so maybe that's better for circulation. Going to invest in a pair.

I'm with you on this one

charlie

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Re: trekking poles
« Reply #17 on: March 16, 2013, 11:41:18 AM »
Love mine and what they've done to save my knees  after a lifetime of installing floors and being up on roofs. I like the adjustables for the ability to change from uphill to downhill. I lengthen them on the downhills. We also use them to make tarp shelters. Many great tarp-tents out there now for ultra light backpacking. I use ours for to make a cook tent and emergency rain shelters. I've had no problem sticking a pair of socks over the ends and putting them right in the packs when we air travel.  Two downsides from experience- Don't rely on them to hold all your weight- my wife had a tumble when she leaned too far forward  coming down a steep section around a boulder, placing most of her weight on the poles-one collapsed and she went down. The other is the straps. I usually put my hands through the straps and  the section crossing the back of my hand created a real problem.  I had sprayed DEET on my hands thanks to tons of skeeters  in LLV and where we camped in the Gems.  We then did a trip into the Cottonwood Lakes the next day and  I got a bad  chemical burn and had to walk back out the same day. I was bummed, as I wanted to go up Langley.  They tell you not to  cover skin with Deet on it. I never though about the straps until my hands felt like they were being held under a torch.   We hightailed it up to Bishop and found some stuff to put on it. I think Solarcaine with Aloe ended up giving some relief. Other than that, between lighter loads and the poles- adding many miles and years to our hiking.  Thanks for the thread SS. Hope you love yours.




Charlie

Sierraslam

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Re: trekking poles
« Reply #18 on: March 19, 2013, 09:33:48 AM »
going shopping for a pair this weekend. thanks for all the input. never knew that about deet. any rash, blister or sore is magnified times 100 in the back country.

bj

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Re: trekking poles
« Reply #19 on: March 19, 2013, 10:49:29 AM »
Poles are great for stream x'ings and really save the knees. Also good for encouraging lazy rattlesnakes off the trail.
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charlie

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Re: trekking poles
« Reply #20 on: March 19, 2013, 05:00:28 PM »
x2 on the stream crossings!    :clap: