Author Topic: Hoover Lahonton Cutthroats  (Read 31544 times)

bj

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Re: Hoover Lahonton Cutthroats
« Reply #50 on: March 26, 2014, 08:07:33 AM »
Folks were tough in those days!
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wshawkins

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Re: Hoover Lahonton Cutthroats
« Reply #51 on: March 27, 2014, 07:11:42 AM »
Took three weeks for a six-horse team to make the round trip between Sonora and Bridgeport, which just takes a few hours today!  Yeah, you had to be tough to handle that job!
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wshawkins

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Re: Hoover Lahonton Cutthroats
« Reply #52 on: March 27, 2014, 07:13:17 AM »
Hiram Lewis Leavitt


Leavitt Falls, Leavitt Peak, Leavitt Lake, Leavitt Meadow, Leavitt Station and Leavitt Creek were all named in honor of Hiram Lewis Leavitt.  In 1856, he and his family moved to a newly built home in what then was known as Indian Valley but today is called Bridgeport.


Mono County's Bridgeport was a growing town and Leavitt operated a stage stop business at what was called Leavitt Station, and later an inn, known today as the Bridgeport Inn.   He also served as a judge.  In that same year, Leavitt built his hostelry at the east end of Sonora Pass to serve the growing traffic, primarily miners, traveling between Sonora and today's Aurora, Nevada.


Bridgeport Inn
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wshawkins

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Re: Hoover Lahonton Cutthroats
« Reply #53 on: March 28, 2014, 07:08:45 AM »
***Waterfalls***


Discovering the many waterfalls in the Sonora Pass is one of our familyís favorite things to do while we vacation in the Sonora Pass area.  The hypnotizing natural phenomenon of waterfalls in Sonora Pass is graciously provided by Mother Nature herself.  Waterfalls are at their scenic best when there has been recent rainfall or during the spring runoff.  They may not be quite as splashy during the summer months.


Falls Creek Falls


Once you had your fill of catching the large Lahonton Cutthroats, hike to Falls Creek Falls that is close by.  In the meadow immediately south of Lane Lake pick up the old trail that parallels the river.  Follow it past the beaver pond and upstream about 0.2 of a mile.  Watch for "use trails" leading off to the right to the waterfall.  This is Falls Creek Falls.  This waterfall cascades down over 600' from the western canyon walls as it makes it way towards the West Walker River near Lane Lake.  You can also see it just south of Lane Lake if you climb up the nearest crest.


Falls Creek Falls
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wshawkins

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Re: Hoover Lahonton Cutthroats
« Reply #54 on: March 28, 2014, 07:11:26 AM »
On your way back to the trail and back to Lane Lake, there is an old plane crash site nearby you can check out if you like.  Most of the debris was scattered along a burnt line with a pile of singed springs, nuts, bolts and other parts.  Also found a door, front end of the small plane (Cessna), a wing, and the engine among misalliances big pieces.  I did talk to a ranger later about this crash site and he let me know it was a crash site known to them.  He mentioned there are quite a few crash sites in the area.


Looking Back at Lane and Roosevelt Lakes at Falls Creek Falls view site and just north of the crash site.
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wshawkins

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Re: Hoover Lahonton Cutthroats
« Reply #55 on: March 29, 2014, 08:35:49 AM »
Poore Falls


While youíre fishing for trophy sized Eastern Brook in Poore Lake, look just east of Poore Lake for a good view of Poore Falls.   This is a waterfall that drops over 200' in several steps.


Poore Falls
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wshawkins

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Re: Hoover Lahonton Cutthroats
« Reply #56 on: March 31, 2014, 06:57:10 AM »
Leavitt Falls


If youíre only going to check out one of the falls, Leavitt Falls should be on the top of your list!  You can drive to it; it has a nice viewing platform, picnic tables are provided for your lunch break and has a restroom.  To get to Leavitt Falls, drive 1.3 miles west from the Leavitt Meadow Pack Station, watching for a sign and turnoff.  A short trail leads to spectacular views of the falls.  The falls drops about 250 feet in several steps.


Leavitt Falls




Leavitt Falls
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Mr. Magoo

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Re: Hoover Lahonton Cutthroats
« Reply #57 on: March 31, 2014, 04:17:37 PM »

wshawkins

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Re: Hoover Lahonton Cutthroats
« Reply #58 on: April 01, 2014, 07:14:44 AM »
Nice video of the falls rpm!  That really captures the beauty of the falls during a very wet year.


Besides the falls, the overlook affords great views of Leavitt Meadow below.


Leavitt Meadow


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wshawkins

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Re: Hoover Lahonton Cutthroats
« Reply #59 on: April 02, 2014, 07:03:38 AM »
Silver Falls


Another falls close by is Silver Falls.  Silver Falls is between Leavitt Meadow and Poore Meadow.  To get there, start at the Leavitt Meadow Campground and drive 0.8 miles east and watch for it on your left.  It makes about a 20 foot drop in two tiers.  As I mentioned before, this is one of the areas where you can observe the Lahonton Cutthroats spawning, but no fishing allowed on Silver Creek.  There is also a trailhead here so plenty of parking is available.



Silver Falls


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wshawkins

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Re: Hoover Lahonton Cutthroats
« Reply #60 on: April 03, 2014, 06:58:22 AM »
Crystal Falls


Crystal Falls has several tiers and is located on Sullivan Creek downstream from Twain Harte. To view the falls, take Phoenix Lake Road a few miles east of Sonora and follow it up almost 6 miles. Turn right onto Glenwood Road and then up to Crystal Falls Drive.


Crystal Falls

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wshawkins

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Re: Hoover Lahonton Cutthroats
« Reply #61 on: April 04, 2014, 07:17:47 AM »
Niagara Creek Falls


Niagara Creek Falls is somewhat difficult to get a good viewing point, but worth the effort.  It is on Niagara Creek as it spills into Donnell Reservoir.  The falls drops a spectacular 700 feet in a series of falls.  To best view the falls, park in a little turnout .3 miles west of the Donnell Overlook.


Follow a use-trail down the embankment until you are on a relatively flat bench (about 200 feet from your car). Turn left and work your way along this bench (up and down) until you reach a view point where you can see the falls, which is about 200 yards.  Iíd like to add that this is not a place for small children or anyone thatís not sure-footed.


The construction crews of the Sonora and Mono Wagon Road from the 1860s used to come out from their work camp in the evenings and sit on a rock near this point and view Niagara Creek Falls.



Niagara Creek Falls near the upper tier
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wshawkins

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Re: Hoover Lahonton Cutthroats
« Reply #62 on: April 05, 2014, 07:09:05 AM »
Deadman Creek Falls


Located on the west side of Sonora Pass, 25-foot Deadman Creek Falls is on your left as you are headed up the pass.  It's about a half mile before Blue Canyon Falls.  You can see from the road but pull over for a better look. 


Deadman Creek was originally called Rattlesnake Creek and then called the North Branch of the Middle Fork of the Stanislaus River.  In the mid-1860s a winter traveler ignored warnings about blizzard conditions on the pass and set out on foot.  His frozen body was found a few days later along the side of the creek. The stream has been known as Deadman Creek ever since.



Deadman Creek Falls
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wshawkins

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Re: Hoover Lahonton Cutthroats
« Reply #63 on: April 07, 2014, 06:54:22 AM »
Blue Canyon Falls


Located on the west side of Sonora Pass about 6 miles past the turnoff to Kennedy Meadows and a half mile from Deadman Creek Falls, this 25-foot waterfall appears on your right as you are headed up the pass. Look for Blue Canyon Falls spilling down the black volcanic rock.



Blue Canyon Falls



There are several small lakes that are hidden from view in the canyons above the falls.  Pretty lakes but all are fishless.  A string of high summits loom above, the highest of them is 11,500-foot Leavitt Peak.


On the opposite side of the highway may be interesting for some here.  Look for a gully leading up to the ridge above the road.  There you will see stonework from the original Sonora and Mono Wagon Road as it veered up from the canyon.  The rounded ridge was known to early teamsters as the Hog's Back.   As you drive up the pass, watch on your left for sections of stone embankments from the early road. 
"It isn't the mountains ahead that wear you out, it's the grain of sand in your shoe."

wshawkins

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Re: Hoover Lahonton Cutthroats
« Reply #64 on: April 08, 2014, 06:50:53 AM »
Sardine Creek Falls


Sardine Creek Falls are a series of falls located on the east side of Sonora Pass near the summit of the pass. As soon as you cross the pass heading east, look to your right (south) for the falls.  Another cascade can be seen to the right of Sardine Creek Falls. 


Sardine Creek Falls



You could make a short hike out to a point above Sardine Creek Falls by taking the Pacific Crest Trail south from the top of Sonora Pass. It's only about a half mile walk, best done when snow has left the trail.
« Last Edit: April 09, 2014, 07:07:34 AM by wshawkins »
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wshawkins

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Re: Hoover Lahonton Cutthroats
« Reply #65 on: April 09, 2014, 07:09:18 AM »
Sardine Falls


Sardine Falls are on the east side of Sonora Pass at Sardine Meadow. As you are headed east it is on your right, some distance away but easy to spot.  It is actually two falls, an upper fall of 50 feet and a lower one at 20 feet.  Named for the small silvery trout found in the creeks. 


Sardine Falls




You can also see Sardine Falls from McKay Creek.  The Pacific Crest Trail traverses the ridge high above the falls, passing from Sonora Pass south toward Yosemite.  Although there is no established trail, you can hike cross-country to the base of Sardine Falls.  Park along the road at the lower end of the meadow, that way you can avoid the thick bushes.  A trail to Leavitt Lake begins there, but you want to aim for Sardine Falls.  It's about a 1.5 mile hike.
"It isn't the mountains ahead that wear you out, it's the grain of sand in your shoe."

wshawkins

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Re: Hoover Lahonton Cutthroats
« Reply #66 on: April 10, 2014, 07:10:33 AM »
Leavitt Meadows Pack Station


On Spot Pack Trips you ride in by horseback with a packer to a campsite and are dropped off there for as long as you like.  The packer then returns to pick up you and your gear.

With a Backpack Drop you and your backpacking equipment are taken into the back country and left to proceed on your own backpacking trip.  It's a great way to jump-start a backpacking trip.

On a Base Camp Trip you are packed in with your personal equipment to a base camp set up by the packer/guide.  Meals, tents, and other group equipment are provided.  You can even keep a horse for the days you are in camp if itís permitted for horses.

First class outfit and I highly recommend Leavitt Meadows Pack Station.





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bj

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Re: Hoover Lahonton Cutthroats
« Reply #67 on: April 12, 2014, 11:54:25 AM »
LMPS is a great pack outfit. We've taken 6 trips out of there so I guess we like it.
" Rock on..........Rock the Creek"
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bj

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Re: Hoover Lahonton Cutthroats
« Reply #68 on: May 05, 2014, 04:17:04 PM »
Just a little late with this fishing trip but Iím sure nobody minds.  My target lakes for this trip was are known for their Lahonton Cutthroats.  This northern Eastern Sierra trip area didnít disappoint.  There are 5-6 lakes within a dayís hike of this area where the trout can grow north of 18Ē and some trophy 20Ē + trout thrown in for good measure.  Even the Brookies can get huge here.  Without any doubt a fun place to toss your line.    Hope you enjoy!

Heading up to that area tomorrow for a few days. Will post results next week.


Hoover Wilderness Sign




Hoover Lahonton Cutthroats



Took another late fall season day hike, this time to some good Lahonton Cutthroat lakes.  These lakes are west of Pickel Meadows near the Sonora Pass.  This trip I think fishes best early or late in the season, at least thatís true for me.  These lakes can get too hot in the summer months due to the lower elevations and the fishing suffers.


This 3 Ĺ mile hike from Leavitt Meadow to Lane Lake can be done in less than 2 hours.  Lane Lake and its sister, Roosevelt Lake offers good fishing and comfortable campsites with views of the lakes.  This easy hike would make a great backpacking outing on which to bring children or first timers and introduce them to the wilderness.
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wshawkins

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Re: Hoover Lahonton Cutthroats
« Reply #69 on: May 14, 2014, 07:01:33 AM »
Hope you do well bj.  I left plenty of big Cutthroats for you and your fishing party. :fishing3:
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Bdreg

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Re: Hoover Lahonton Cutthroats
« Reply #70 on: May 15, 2014, 01:47:25 PM »
  What a treasure of information in this thread!
  These posts were inspiring as I prepared for my Leavitt Meadows trip (I'm a total newbie at backpacking and fishing).
  I've probably got a lot more ideas for future adventures from all these posts.
  Poore Lake was where I wanted to catch some brookies.

  The drought has really taken it's toll there. I hope those fish survive the summer. I didn't try fishing as the south and east shores were like quicksand and I needed to find a campsite to setup before dark.
 What happens to fish when waters shrivel up like this? The rain and snow are a long way off.  I'd heard good things abut the brook trout in Poore in years past.

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Re: Hoover Lahonton Cutthroats
« Reply #71 on: May 15, 2014, 01:50:30 PM »
 Overnighted at Lane Lake. Fish were rising all over at sunset, some were coming out of the water, further than I could cast. Caught a couple on like a sparkle dun? with a parachute size 16.
 

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Re: Hoover Lahonton Cutthroats
« Reply #72 on: May 15, 2014, 01:51:11 PM »
 My presentation was horrible, had a short leader with barely any tippet on it, so the fish were definitely willing to work with me.
  Tried the Walker next to Lane Lake the next morning  for a bit. No luck, but I got shake off some rust and work on my learning curve (been about 10 months since I last fished).
  I hiked out through the meadow, and parts of the Walker looked real good as far as flow and area for backcasting.

wshawkins

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Re: Hoover Lahonton Cutthroats
« Reply #73 on: May 15, 2014, 10:05:11 PM »
Welcome to the Rock Creek's Message Board Bdreg!  Glad this tread is inspiring you to take on future adventures.

Itís sad what happened to Poore Lake.  I fished it in June 2012 and it was about 60% full, but itís a reservoir and they when they need the water they drain it down, so whatís left is a big mud hole.  Fishing was good for me with several Brookies in the 18Ē range, quite big for a Brookie!

Looks like it went well in Lane Lake.  Nice looking Cutthroat!  My fly of choice in most of the lakes in that area is what I call a Roosevelt/Lane Special, my version of a Scud.

For posting pictures, most here use Photobucket.  Here is the link for the instructions on ďHow To Post PhotosĒ.

http://www.rockcreeklake.com/board/index.php?topic=16.0
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Bdreg

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Re: Hoover Lahonton Cutthroats
« Reply #74 on: May 16, 2014, 09:04:49 AM »
 wshawkins, Thanks for telling me about Poore.
 I guess I did see a sort of dam at the north and should of realized it was a reservoir.

 Also thanks for photo instructions, I'd like to setup my photos for inserting so I can get those nice flowing posts you and others have.

 But again, my real reason for posting here was to thank you all for this thread with all it's photos and history.
 I'm a native Californian with some years under my belt, and I'm always amazed at how much there is to discover out there!